Archive for the 'Experimental Biology Blogging 2011' category

Experimental Biology 2013!

Apr 23 2013 Published by under Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

Sadly, Sci is NOT joining in the fun at the 2013 Experimental Biology meeting. :(  I really wish that I could have gone this year, but sadly, it's not possible, and I'm going to be one of those horrible deadbeats with an empty posterboard.

But there are others at Experimental Biology, and they are blogging and tweeting up a storm! Make sure to check out @katiesci, who is blogging on behalf of the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics! She's already got a post or two up on experiencing Boston this week from a science perspective, on careers in science, and on cognitive flexibility! Also make sure you drop by and read David Despain, who is writing for the American Society for Nutrition, and already has a great post up on carotenoids. And don't miss Biochembelle, who is blogging on behalf of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and has a great post up on the different ways to be an advocate for science, many of which are much easier than you think!

 

So even if, like me, you can't be AT Experimental Biology this year, you can experience it virtually! Follow the blogging and follow along on Twitter, to catch all the latest science!

 

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Experimental Biology Blogging: Self-promotion and 'self-promotion'

May 09 2012 Published by under Academia, Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

I realize it's been a while since EB 2012 ended and I left the not-so-sunny San Diego (at least, it wasn't sunny at the time). Conferences are always great for the development of ideas. You get new ideas about your research, new directions to go in or troubleshooting things to try.

And at EB this year, I also got some ideas about communicating science. Or at least, I had some ideas thrown at me. They crystallized what I believe to be one of the major issues facing scientists who blog: needless self-promotion.


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Friday Weird Science: TAINT TWEETS

While Sci recovers from the Experimental Biology meeting, I invite you to enjoy this storify, taken as Pascale and I enjoyed an American Physiological Association presentation on...taints. That's right. 'Taint balls, 'Taint anus, it's the area in between. And there are some new and interesting findings in the taint world, not to mention all the hilarity!

[View the story "It ain't nothing else...it #TaintTweets" on Storify]

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Experimental Biology Blogging: Every once in a while, a double cheeseburger might not be so bad for the heart.

Apr 26 2012 Published by under Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

At Sci Am Blogs today, I've got my latest (but not QUITE the last!) piece on the newest work coming out of the Experimental Biology meeting. Today I am very pleased to be catching up on the work of the Jones lab at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and their project involving the effects of a high-fat diet on heart attack outcomes. Head over and check it out!

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Experimental Biology Blogging: Hallucinating Zebrafish

Apr 25 2012 Published by under Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

For day 4 of the Experimental Biology conference, I'm talking about a study examining the effects of hallucinogens on zebrafish behavior, and their potential usefulness as a model for schizophrenia. Head over and check it out!

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Experimental Biology Blogging: cancer chemotherapy and cognitive deficits

Apr 24 2012 Published by under Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

For day 3 of the Experimental Biology conference, I found a cool new study examining the effect of cancer chemotherapy on cognitive function in mice. With more and more cancer survivors, we now have to think about the long term effects of chemotherapy, and how to make sure that cancer survivors can have the best life possible. And this means mouse models of long-term chemotherapy effects. Head over and check it out.

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Experimental Biology Blogging: Using a chemical from slime mold to stop cancer spread

At Scientific American, I'm talking about a cool poster I saw on Day 2 of the Experimental Biology conference, where a chemical called Dif-1 from slime mold may be able to attack estrogen receptor alpha positive breast cancers! Head over a check it out.

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Experimental Biology Blogging: Using punishment to stop drug reinforcement

Apr 22 2012 Published by under Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

Sci's first post for Experimental Biology 2012 is up at Scientific American! I'm writing on a study looking at histamine as a drug punisher to decrease the reinforcing value of cocaine. Head over and check it out!

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Experimental Biology Blogging: Ask both what your Society does for you, and what you do for your Society

So this will hopefully be one of the last of Sci's Experimental Biology Blogging posts. It's been a great experience, but OH MAN has it been tiring. But this will be the last, I think.

Sci got into blogging Experimental Biology through the interest and very kind advocacy of the communications officer of the American Physiological Society, Donna Krupa. Not only was she wonderful about getting me all the information I needed and getting me in touch with some really cool people (WOO!!! SCIENCE!!!), she also gave me access to the press room, which is a lovely little haven of glory, power outlets, and wireless. I only discovered it toward the end, but I definitely hammered out more than one of the Experimental Biology posts there.

And while I was in there powering up my laptop(s) (yup), and blogging away, I got to meet several of the people from the various societies represented at Experimental Biology: the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET), the American Association of Anatomists (AAA), the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), the American Physiological Society (APS), the American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP), and the American Society for Nutrition (ASN).

And when I met them, I realized...I had no idea what they DID. I mean, organize the meeting, sure...but, what else?! I don't know about other grad students/post-docs/hey, maybe you're TT by now, but societies have always been just...things. You know. Those THINGS you should be in because everyone tells you that you should, and it looks good on your CV and funding people like it and then of course you get discounts for meetings. You know, just BECAUSE.

But it's really far more than that. I dug around a little, and then got a chance to sit around and shoot the breeze with two lovely members of ASBMB, Ben Corb (director of public affairs), and Angela Hopp (communicator for ASBMB and managing editor for special projects at the Journal of Biological Chemistry). (For the record, you can follow them both on Twitter, Ben at @bwcorb and Angela at @angelahopp.) We had a great conversation about what it is that they do and, more importantly, what scientists can, and should, be doing through their societies, and I've got some of my impressions below the fold.

But first off, what do these societies DO?

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Guest Post at Science of Blogging: On Blogging Conferences

Apr 26 2011 Published by under Experimental Biology Blogging 2011

Sci is guest posting over at Science of Blogging today, where I will be talking about my recent blogging of the Experimental Biology 2011 Conference and offer my perspective (and some tips, though you by no means need to take them) on blogging a conference as a scientist. If you're interested in blogging a conference at some point, and want to see how Sci does her magic (cause I'm so magical, you guys, like Peeps are magical), go check it out!! :)

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